Opening ways
for new medicines

Our GLP-compliant laboratory provides in vitro and in vivo tests of product candidates to facilitate drug development projects with most attractive efficiency and timeline

News

March 01, 2018

Key Preclinicals participates in 17th Annual World Preclinical Congress
(June 18-21, 2018, The Westin Copley Place | Boston, MA).

WPCE

The 17th Annual World Preclinical Congress focuses on the latest trends and technologies impacting drug discovery and translational research. The Congress offers a unique opportunity for chemists, biologists, pharmacologists, cancer researchers, neuroscience scientists, toxicologists, bioengineers, screening experts and translational scientists in industry and academia as well as technology providers to come together and exchange expertise and opinions. World Preclinical Congress is a key networking event yielding new partnerships that accelerate preclinical research and translation across all therapeutic areas.

About

The Key Preclinicals laboratory is set up on the premises of the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine. There are about 60 people on the staff of Key Preclinicals, with 34 of them directly involved in preclinical drug testing.

The Key Preclinicals laboratory for primary drug trials provides an advanced highly-efficient and solid framework of services to companies and academic institutions performing pharmaceutical and biotech research. Available among our products is a variety of in vitro and in vivo tests, including the following:

Drug safety

General toxicologySafety pharmacology (ICH S7A and S7B)

Specific pharmacological activity

AntihypertensiveAnti-inflammatoryAnti-ischaemicAntiarrhythmic

Studies of drug bioavailability

In vitro and in vivo ADMET tests

Our lab image gallery:

Services

The list of currently available services include the following in vitro ADMET tests:

To read detailed information about our company's preclinical drug trials services, please download the promo materials below:

ADMET services (6Mb)
Company booklet (25Mb)
Company presentation (3Mb)

Solubility: HT Thermodynamic method

  • HT Thermodynamic method – enables rapid and accurate evaluation of a large number of compounds

  • Solubility is determined by dispensing a solid compound into a solvent (DMSO and PBS) with further HPLC quantification

  • Results from thermodynamic solubility determinations more frequently refer to a crystalline phase

  • Resulting concentrations are dependent on compound purity, ionization states, stability in solution and other factors such as solution temperature and pH

Partition Coefficient LogP (n-octanol/water): Shake Flask Method

  • HT Thermodynamic method – enables rapid and accurate evaluation of a large number of compounds

  • Solubility is determined by dispensing a solid compound into a solvent (DMSO and PBS) with further HPLC quantification

  • Results from thermodynamic solubility determinations more frequently refer to a crystalline phase

  • Resulting concentrations are dependent on compound purity, ionization states, stability in solution and other factors such as solution temperature and pH

Solubility: HT Kinetic Method

  • Uses only a few samples and allows rapid determination of solubility

  • The non-equilibrium solubility method can be used during early drug discovery of new chemical entity and for lead optimization

  • The purpose of the measurements is to identify compounds that do not have good kinetic solubility even in aqueous buffer containing DMSO, to guide modification of structures to improve solubility, and to guide formulation selection for animal dosing

  • Kinetic solubility data vary with the conditions of the solution: small changes in pH, organic solvent, ionic strength, ions in solution, co-solutes, incubation time, and temperature can result in large changes in the solubility of a compound

(Data sheet is under development)

Volume of distribution (log Vss): bio-mimetic chromatography method

  • Bio-mimetic chromatography allows to model in vivo distribution and estimate affinity of a compound for human non-specific binding components by using human proteins and phospholipid as biorelevant stationary phases

  • The basic principle of the methodology is that the retention time of a compound (as a part of the mobile phases) passing through the HPLC column (containing three biorelevant stationary phases) is directly proportional to its affinity/dynamic equilibrium with the stationary phase

  • Application of bio-mimetic chromatography reduces animal testing and late stage attrition, lowers candidate selection cost and allows early dose estimation

  • We have modified the original methodology (by K. Valko) to implement it for high-accuracy plasma protein binding (PPB) detection. It has been successfully validated using experimental literature data for %PPB of known compounds.

(Data sheet is under development)

Brain tissue binding: bio-mimetic chromatography method

  • Bio-mimetic chromatography allows to model in vivo distribution and estimate affinity of a compound for human non-specific binding components by using human proteins and phospholipid as biorelevant stationary phases

  • The basic principle of the methodology is that the retention time of a compound (as a part of the mobile phases) passing through the HPLC column (containing three biorelevant stationary phases) is directly proportional to its affinity/dynamic equilibrium with the stationary phase

  • Application of bio-mimetic chromatography reduces animal testing and late stage attrition, lowers candidate selection cost and allows early dose estimation

  • We have modified the original methodology (by K. Valko) to implement it for high-accuracy plasma protein binding (PPB) detection. It has been successfully validated using experimental literature data for %PPB of known compounds.

(Data sheet is under development)

Lung tissue binding: bio-mimetic chromatography method

  • Bio-mimetic chromatography allows to model in vivo distribution and estimate affinity of a compound for human non-specific binding components by using human proteins and phospholipid as biorelevant stationary phases

  • The basic principle of the methodology is that the retention time of a compound (as a part of the mobile phases) passing through the HPLC column (containing three biorelevant stationary phases) is directly proportional to its affinity/dynamic equilibrium with the stationary phase

  • Application of bio-mimetic chromatography reduces animal testing and late stage attrition, lowers candidate selection cost and allows early dose estimation

  • We have modified the original methodology (by K. Valko) to implement it for high-accuracy plasma protein binding (PPB) detection. It has been successfully validated using experimental literature data for %PPB of known compounds.

(Data sheet is under development)

Plasma protein binding: bio-mimetic chromatography method

  • Bio-mimetic chromatography allows to model in vivo distribution and estimate affinity of a compound for human non-specific binding components by using human proteins and phospholipid as biorelevant stationary phases

  • The basic principle of the methodology is that the retention time of a compound (as a part of the mobile phases) passing through the HPLC column (containing three biorelevant stationary phases) is directly proportional to its affinity/dynamic equilibrium with the stationary phase

  • Application of bio-mimetic chromatography reduces animal testing and late stage attrition, lowers candidate selection cost and allows early dose estimation

  • We have modified the original methodology (by K. Valko) to implement it for high-accuracy plasma protein binding (PPB) detection. It has been successfully validated using experimental literature data for %PPB of known compounds.

Unbound volume of distribution (log Vdu): bio-mimetic chromatography method

  • Bio-mimetic chromatography allows to model in vivo distribution and estimate affinity of a compound for human non-specific binding components by using human proteins and phospholipid as biorelevant stationary phases

  • The basic principle of the methodology is that the retention time of a compound (as a part of the mobile phases) passing through the HPLC column (containing three biorelevant stationary phases) is directly proportional to its affinity/dynamic equilibrium with the stationary phase

  • Application of bio-mimetic chromatography reduces animal testing and late stage attrition, lowers candidate selection cost and allows early dose estimation

  • We have modified the original methodology (by K. Valko) to implement it for high-accuracy plasma protein binding (PPB) detection. It has been successfully validated using experimental literature data for %PPB of known compounds.

(Data sheet is under development)

Contacts

KEY PRECLINICALS

Anatoly Soloviev, Prof, DSc, MD, PhD
Head of Key Preclinicals Laboratory
Phone/Fax (direct): +38 044 536 1341
Phone (office): +38 044 456 0288
Cell Phone: +38 050 445 5769
e-mail: Anatoly.Soloviev@keypreclinicals.com

Andrew Golub, PhD
Representative in North America
Phone/Fax: +1 800 401 1533
e-mail: Andrew.Golub@keypreclinicals.com

LIFE CHEMICALS INC.

Alexey Poyarkov, PhD
Head of Physico-Chemical Laboratory
Phone: +38 044 391 6618
Fax: : +38 044 574 1417
Cell: +38 067 288 2880
e-mail: Alexey.Poyarkov@lifechemicals.com

Vasily Pinchuk, PhD
Head of Marketing and Sales
Phone: +1 250 448 6545
Cell: +1 250 469 0997
Phone/Fax: +1 800 592 7430
e-mail: Vasily.Pinchuk@lifechemicals.com


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